Australia-China economic relationship: towards an innovative future

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When:
November 17, 2015 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
2015-11-17T15:00:00+08:00
2015-11-17T17:00:00+08:00
Where:
Room 301, level three, School of Foreign Languages (New Building), Peking University (behind the Lakeview Hotel in the north-eastern part of campus)
Peking University
5 Yi He Yuan Lu, Haidian Qu, Beijing Shi, China
100080
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Amanda Barry
15011440032

Australia-China economic relationship: towards an innovative future

Tuesday 17 November 2015, 3pm-5pm
A Roundtable hosted by the Australian Studies Centre, Peking University

Venue

Room 301, level three, School of Foreign Languages (New Building), Peking University (behind the Lakeview Hotel in the north-eastern part of campus)

 

Attendance/RSVP

This event is by invitation only, as places are limited. To register your interest please email Dr Amanda Barry abarry@fasic.org.au by Friday 13th November.

 

Speakers

Professor Paul H. Jensen Chair in Public Policy & Engagement, Acting Director, Melbourne Institute, Assistant Director, Melbourne School of Government, University of Melbourne

Associate Professor Tao Kong Institute of Social Science Survey, Peking University

Mr Lachlan Crews Counsellor (Economic), Australian Embassy Beijing

Professor Ding Dou Australian Studies Centre, Peking University

Mr Paul Hubbard Australian National University/Peking University

Ms Hu Dan Assistant Professor, Australian Studies Centre, Beijing Foreign Studies University

 

Summary

The Australia-China economic relationship is regularly in the headlines, recently and most notably due to the historic Free Trade Agreement, endorsed by former Prime Minister Tony Abbot and President Xi Jinping in November 2014. More recently, on his elevation to Australia’s Prime Ministership, Malcolm Turnbull has stressed the importance of economic reform and innovation, noting in the process that the Australia-China Free Trade Agreement is vital to Australia’s economic health in the post-resources-boom era. However, as the FTA has come under closer scrutiny some of its labour market provisions have received criticism from the union movement and the Labor Party opposition.

This Roundtable will discuss what it means to have an innovative economy and will review the history and current standing of the FTA.  In a context of China’s slowing growth, the Chinese government has highlighted “innovation” and “entrepreneurship” as key future drivers of its huge economy. Prime Minister Turnbull has drawn attention to China’s transition and has invited Australians to also consider what economic transition might entail for China and for Australia.

In this Roundtable event hosted by the Australian Studies Centre, Peking University, participants will examine the future of the economic relationship and discuss ‘where to from here’ with particular emphasis on policy reform, the importance of innovation as China transforms and the implications of Australia’s changed leadership.

 

Program

Please download the full program here.